Articles


Zen: Stillness and nothing else

Ime Morales

by Ime Morales

Is Zen a religion, a philosophy, a movement? How does it fit into our daily lives? Here is firsthand information from a practitioner.

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 ZEN by Michael Tan

Michael Tan

MANILA, Philippines — Among Asian countries, the Philippines has been the least influenced byBuddhism. Even neighboring Indonesia, the world?s largest Muslim country, has several grand ancient Buddhist temples, notably Borobodur. In the Philippines, some of our archaeological siteshave yielded Buddha images, but Buddhism itself never did gain too many adherents. Today, it is mainly associated with older Chinese-Filipinos, who worship at a few dozen temples scattered throughout the archipelago.

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Tony Perlas

the late Tony Perlas Roshi

Though i was not fortunate enough to have gotten to know the enigmatic Dr. Antonio Perlas, having joined the Zen Center for Oriental Spirituality years after his death, i still remain awed by the way people still speak of him. When i joined the Zen Center and got the chance to work for them, i found a copy of the book “The Bright Field”, a book written by colleagues, friends and family of Dr. Antonio “Tony” Perlas after he died, as a tribute to the man.

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Maria Teresa (Nenates) Pineda Interview

PINEDA Roshi

Nenates Pineda ROSHI

Nenates Pineda (MYÔUN-AN) is a Zen teacher in the Sanbo-Kyodan school of Zen, recognized as such by Koun Yamada-Roshi and confirmed by his successor Kubota Ji’un Roshi in 1993. Born in the Phillipines and raised Catholic, Pineda took her Zen orientation at the Phillipine Zendo in 1983. Pineda is a longtime student of Sister Elaine Maclnnes, and currently lives in Toronto, Canada. On Tuesday evenings gathers with others for meditation practice at Holy Rosary Church in Toronto. She also holds sesshin and one days retreats at Scarboro Missions.

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Prison yoga, meditation classes to expand across Canada

MacINNES Roshi

Ellaine MacInnes

For over a decade, Sister Elaine MacInnes has struggled to raise enough funds to keep her small charity, which offers meditation and yoga to inmates, afloat. Freeing the Human Spirit has faced an uphill battle since MacInnes first started it in 2001, when Ottawa bureaucrats initially told her there was no place for her in the correctional system.

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